JP Morgan still has Cryptophobia

It may have seemed that with the announcement of the JPM Coin, the banking giant had overcome its ‘cryptophobia’. However, I cam across a story last week that indicates it is still some way from showing crypto the love.

Cryptoraves, a company that is working on the tokenization of social media, had its bank account shut down last month by JP Morgan, without any explanation whatsoever.

In the long run, JP Morgan told them they were working in a “prohibited industry.” But that is as much information as Cryptoraves could wring out the stone that is the bank.

Cryptoraves was surprised to receive a letter saying, “After a recent review of your account, we have decided to end our relationship with you.” That is like ending a relationship by text. It is rather harsh, all the more because it doesn’t provide any reason for the break-up. Who wants a bank that treats its customers like this?

And is Cryptoraves really operating in a “prohibited industry”? Go to its website and the first thing you see is that you can get “FREE TOKENS.” People use the tokens to boost their credibility on social media. For example, a Twitter user can request free tokens and send them to other Twitter users. The tokens have no actual value, therefore they are not securities in the regulatory sense.

Cryptoraves has published an assessment of where it thinks the issue with JP Morgan arose: “We did send two wire transfers to Gemini to buy ETH and LOOM in order to cover future blockchain fees. We suspected that these transactions flagged our account, but the Chase rep would not confirm this. They would not give us a reason for the closure. We called the number in the letter and the agent told us to visit a branch for these details. Visiting our branch resulted in no other details except when our branch rep pressed the agent (yep as the primary course of action, our rep called the same phone number), they said we were operating in an ‘prohibited industry’. I guess JPM’s own blockchain department didn’t get the memo?”

Furthermore, Cryptoraves had had a 15-year relationship with the bank and praised its service. There is a suggestion that the timing of the account closure is connected to the launch of the JPM Coin, but that may just be a bit of a conspiracy theory. What is clear though is that banks are still making it difficult for crypto-related companies and crypto owners, especially when something as innocuous as a transfer can result in your account being closed.

JP Morgan surprises us with a stablecoin

When JP Morgan announced the launch of its very own stablecoin, the industry was somewhat shocked. Was this not the big bank that loathed cryptocurrencies? The move got people excited, both in traditional banking and in the crypto community. But is the JPM Coin really as big a deal as everyone seems to think it is.

Naturally, the industry pricks up its ears when JP Morgan speaks, and any of its previous explorations of the blockchain have produced similar interest. As Ben Jessel, head of enterprise blockchain at Kadena remarks, “In the last few weeks, blockchain innovation managers’ phones across Wall Street investment banks have been ringing with executives inquiring about JP Morgan’s stablecoin and how they should be responding.”

That’s because enterprise blockchain technology has been the way that big companies have sought to harness blockchain technology to meet their needs as large organisations. JP Morgan’s move has made others question what to do next — is this the time to jump in and be first in the fast-follower line?

Initially, the JPM Coin seems exciting, because it suggests that Wall Street is beginning to “blur the lines between institutional banking and the brave new world of cryptocurrency,” as Jessel suggests. But the reality is not so simple.

Faster, cheaper settlements

JP Morgan’s stablecoin seeks to solve two problems in financial markets today: the expensive and inefficient process of settlement and the volatility involved in holding money in cryptocurrency. Settlement is expensive for banks for a number of reasons: first, payments are rarely made in real-time, which means that in many cases funds that should be paid are not actually made available until the end of the day. For the banks, this means billions of dollars can be tied up and can’t be used.

Blockchain speeds the process up, making the process less expensive for banks and reducing the liquidity trap, i.e. funds being tied up in the process of settlement.

JP Morgan’s stablecoin neatly connects the dots between the aspects of settlement and volatility management by providing digital cash that can be used and enabling the ability to redeem the coin at a stable rate. This may sound like a big deal, but in fact all it means is that any counterparty would be paid by JP Morgan issuing a digital certificate. At its most fundamental, JP Morgan is promising to credit the account of a user when presented with a digital certificate that has a redemption value of a dollar.

Having said all this, JP Morgan’s new ‘Coin’ is not an insignificant development. Don’t forget, this is an industry where they still use fax machines, so in that context, the JPM Coin is actually a pretty big deal.