Dogecoin passion could prevent government crypto bans

Dogecoin, which has existed for a few years, is not a cryptocurrency of the usual kind. It’s a fun, ‘meme’ coin and Elon Musk, Gene Simmons, The Jonas Brothers and Snoop Doge have been having some fun with it recently. However, although it has no utility, Noelle Acheson, says “it embodies two key themes impacting institutional interest in crypto assets: the role of “fundamentals,” and the likelihood of successful government bans.”

Acheson asks if fun should drive value (Dogecoin is up 1,350% in 2021, and answers her own question with, why not? She points to GameStop (yes, again!) saying that the market’s understanding of ‘value’ is shifting. Matt Levine at Bloomberg summed it up: “Money and value are coordination games; what we use for money depends on the channels that we use to coordinate social activity. Once society was mediated by governments, and we used fiat currency. Now society is mediated by Twitter and Reddit and Elon Musk, so, sure, Dogecoin.”

Even Dogecoin’s founders have no idea why its success has continued some seven years after launching it. But they can’t remove it, or close it down, because Dogecoin runs on a public, decentralized blockchain that no one controls. So, it will probably continue to exist so long as people value its fun element.

It’s about passion

GameStop and Dogecoin both exemplify what community passion can achieve, and how it may potentially block government bans on crypto. For example, India tried to ban cryptocurrencies recently, but the community mobilised, created a hashtag and rallied its members to lobby government representatives. They pointed out that the country has 10-20 million crypto users, plus 340 startups and 50,000 employees in the crypto space.

Something similar happened in Nigeria where the central bank ordered banks to close the accounts of cryptocurrency users. There was a public outcry, and the central bank had to issue a press statement “reminding the public that the rule was not new, and that it was for their own good.” The central bank had to unblock accounts of 20 people involved in the #EndSARS movement, which was about the dissolution of a federal police unit with a reputation for fierce brutality. Acheson says, “The fact that the accounts were frozen in the first place is one of the many reasons seizure-resistant cryptocurrencies are rapidly gaining in popularity amongst Nigeria’s young.” It is also the case that Nigeria is gaining recognition as Africa’s Silicon Valley, and trading crypto assets is a way of life for many young people. They have new tools to work with and a growing disrespect for institutions. Because of the central bank directive, they are simply moving from exchanges to peer-to-peer channels. As a result, the politicians have taken notice,, and some prominent voices in government have spoken out against the ban. Other countries will be watching this with interest, because as Acheson warns, “the very act of attempting to repress cryptocurrency’s use could light a fire under a generational understanding of why it’s necessary.”

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